How-To: DIY Home Renovation Project

 

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“Your home should tell the story of who you are and be a collection of what you love.”
Nate Berkus

When my husband and I moved into our big two-story farm house in 1993, we knew it would take a lot of time, effort and money to update it. Besides having the wiring and plumbing redone to bring it up to code, the interior of the house needed a serious makeover. It was obvious the previous owners didn’t have any decorating sense whatsoever.

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Though it wasn’t quite this bad, it was still pretty bad.

The walls in the dining room and living room were painted light green (the color of pond scum), the windows were hidden under heavy full-length drapes (the kind you’d find in a funeral home or the Munster’s house) and the floors were covered with filthy shag carpeting (I’m sure it harbored all kinds of nasty microscopic critters). The downstairs bathroom looked like it was straight out of a 1970’s flop house – big gold sunflowers against an olive green background, a grungy mustard-colored linoleum floor and a bathtub they probably hauled out of a junk yard. The bathroom upstairs had a long closet decorated with goofy duck stickers instead of a bathtub or shower. I kid you not. It was ridiculous!

Our realtor referred to this 1917 fixer-upper as the “Bates Motel”, but beneath all the unsightly trappings we could see that this place had a lot of character and loads of potential.

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Not exactly welcoming…

For starters, beautifully carved woodwork, plate rails and beveled mirrors in the spacious dining room, bay windows in the dining room, living room and master bedroom, and underneath that hideous shag carpeting we discovered a magnificent oak floor with mahogany inlay. We were also impressed with the size of the kitchen – 17 ft. x 17 ft. with high 10 ft. ceilings – and the charming built-in cabinet, not to mention the transoms above the bedroom doors (something you’d usually find in grand hotels, not private homes.) Suffice it to say this house was a diamond in the rough.

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This is the detailing I’m talking about. Beautiful, huh?

After buying the house for a song, we decided we could save a lot of money if we tackled minor renovations ourselves. It’s taken quite a few years (and muscle) to do some of the improvements and, as with most old houses, there’s still plenty to do. But, anyone who has seen the before and after pictures will agree this place looks ten times better than it did when we first moved in.

If you’re thinking of remodeling your home, I have some ideas for easy and affordable upgrades you can do yourself.

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Look at that technique!

Red Walls

An example of a burgundy dining room.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Give walls a fresh coat of paint. Probably the easiest and least expensive way to change the look of any room is to repaint it. Think beyond the usual shades of beige and go with colors that reflect the mood or purpose of the room or your personal decorating style. For example, try bright yellow or tangerine in the kitchen, rich burgundy or hunter green in the dining room, and fresh lilac or jade green in the bathroom.

  • Need help selecting the right colors? Check out the interior paint guide at bhg.com
  • Learn how to paint like a pro with help from diynetwork.com

Restore or replace your flooring. If you’re lucky enough to have hardwood floors underneath your worn carpet (like we did) and they’re in relatively good condition, you may just need to spruce them up with a floor sander/polisher from a rental place or buy this handy Floor Scrubber/Polisher. You can always get an area rug if you want to add some color and warmth.

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It looks harder than it is, we promise!

On the other hand, if your floors are in bad shape, you’ll want to hide them under new carpeting or flooring. Look for special deals from Empire Today, one of the featured offers in Smart Perks.

Refinish cabinets, shelves and furniture. Instead of investing in new kitchen cabinets, consider refinishing your existing ones with paint or stain. Why not dress them up with different knobs or handles too?

Go to hgtv.com for a simple tutorial on refinishing kitchen cabinets.

Cabinet redo

Photo Courtesy of Pinterest User One Good Thing…

Replace faucets and sinks. Make an outdated bathroom look like new instantly by replacing your faucets and sink with more modern designs. You don’t even need a plumber to do it!

 

Re-tile the floor or backsplash. Tiling is relatively easy. All you need is a little know-how and the right supplies, like tiles (standard subway-style tiles are the most common and the easiest to install), a v-notched trowel, tile mastic (adhesive), a tile cutter, and grout. You can find most of these things at home improvement stores. Go to diynetwork.com for step-by-step instructions on tiling floors, backsplashes, showers and more.

Update window treatments. Get rid of those heavy drapes or dated curtains and put up some sleek new blinds, Roman shades or sheers. Or, you could create your own custom curtains, drapes, shades & more out of materials you already have on hand. Check out the amazing (and easy) DIY Window Treatment ideas from hgtv.com!

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Just one of many options from one of our partners, 3 Day Blinds. Check out Smart Perks for a coupon!

You’ll also find some cool ideas in Melanie’s March 2nd blog post!

For supplies and products, look no further than Smart Perks! You’ll find some great offers from Build.com, Lowe’s, 3 Day Blinds, and more in our Home & Garden section.

Final Note: Before you invest in an older home, have it inspected by a professional to make sure it’s structurally sound. It’s easy to correct cosmetic flaws, but if the foundation is fragile you’ll have a nightmare on your hands. If you don’t believe me, rent the Tom Hanks’ movie The Money Pit!

Good luck and remember, it’s worth all of the effort once you see the fruits of your labor! Have any of you renovated your home yourself and have pics to send? Include them in the comment section!

Catherine B., a Smart Perks employee, may not be handy with a hammer, but she does know how to create an awesome honey-do list.

The Furniture Refurbisher: Willett Table

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Refurbished mid-century modern console table from Willett Furniture

If you’re in the habit of writing off every piece of furniture you see at a garage sale, auction, estate sale or at your local second-hand store, then this post is going to make you think again. Just the other day I was out deal-hunting at an estate-sale for something that I could put in my entryway for holding keys and such, when I stumbled upon this beauty tucked beneath a pile of worn-in children’s clothes and a blender:

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Experience the thrill of the FIND!

OK, maybe it doesn’t look that beautiful in the picture, but this is a classic piece from the Willett Furniture Company which, until it went defunct in 1962, made and sold some truly amazing furniture. Back when this solid-cherry rarity was made in 1957, it cost $105 and would take weeks for it to be delivered because of the company’s special seven-step finishing process. Today though, original Willett pieces can be worth over $1,000 to collectors. And now, right there before me, was an original Willett.

When I recognized the piece for what it is, I broke into a sweat and tried to subtly inquire the nearest seller about the price. I hid my excitement by casually commenting about the weather and verbally noting how high gas prices are getting. THEN I asked about the table. Even though I’m not planning on flipping the piece, if the seller caught onto my excitement then that could spell trouble. After all, there’s a lot of money at stake!

The price I ended up paying for it was far below $250 and I happily took it home. I remake of this same piece would cost around $2,000, so I was reasonably happy. I didn’t want to flip it because I love the look of it and am probably going to hold onto it for a while. However, the piece did need to be refurbished, which quite frankly, I dreaded. I had never done so before, but after spending an hour or so researching and then a weekend doing the actual project itself, I was ready to go. Turns out it was easier than I thought it would be!

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The ubiquitous before shot. You may want to put down a tarp before setting to work.

  1. First, I removed the hardware, and then I had to get all that dust off of there. I cleaned every inch of it with Murphy’s oil soap which gives the piece a natural shine and most importantly cleans it without damaging it.
  2. Then I sanded the tops of the shelves with very light sandpaper (100, 150, and then 220 grit) to get it ready for refinishing. The rest of it I sanded with the 220 grit sand paper.
  3. After cleaning off the dust, I sanded it once more over with 400 grit sandpaper and 0000 steel wool. It’s very important to use light grit sandpapers to avoid scratching the wood.

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  1. We’re almost there – I then used a rag to apply one generous coat of boiled linseed oil. After letting it dry for an hour, I wiped off the excess with a clean rag.10953203_10152843603883589_1605594965250306073_o
  2. Finally, two days later, I repeated step 4 and then let it dry for two more days. Now it lives here:

Looks pretty nice, right? Not bad for $250 from an estate sale. If you’re looking to do this for yourself, it’s very easy. Everything_But_The_House_Online_Estate_Sales_in_Cincinnati,_OH,_Columbus,_OH,_Lexington,_KY,_Louisville,_KY,_Indianapolis,_IN,_Nashville,_TN,_Atlanta,_GA,_and_Fort_Myers,_FL_EBTH_-_2015-05-20_11.26.39Take an afternoon and shop around garage sales, auctions, Grandma’s attic or other places where you might stumble upon something with potential. There are even websites such as eBay and Everything but the House which sell great furniture. Then you have to figure out what needs to be fixed or how to refinish it. Google is pretty good for that, but if you’re internet averse there are always plenty of people willing to help out over at your local hardware store.

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-Jack

As devilishly handsome as he is clever, Jack is the excellent copyeditor for the Smart Perks team. A passionate music-listener, writer, and all-around great guy, Jack is going to help keep you in the know on fun trends and interesting ideas.